Interview with Nicholas Olsberg

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation [announced in early August that Nicholas Olsberg had been hired](/2010/08/foundation-statement-on-the-flw-archives/) to assess and make recommendations for the protection and accessibility of the Foundation's archives, a huge collection of more than 350,000 items. The announcement ended rumors that a sale of the archives was contemplated, and was a sign that the Foundation has actively taking steps to enhance its role as a scholarly resource.

Today, _The Arizona Republic_ has [an article based on an interview with Olsberg](http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2010/08/13/20100813frank-lloyd-wright-work-protected.html) that contains nothing surprising (I've met some archivists, they never say anything surprising), but the article certainly contains good news. He is awed by the size and quality of the colleciton: "There is no other American artist with an archive like this, and that's a huge, huge responsibility". He has ambitious plans for the collection, including making the collection more conducive to researchers:

One suggestion Olsberg expects to make at the end of his six-month assessment is that portions of the collection be made available online. Also, he will advise the board on the features of a new facility that will best protect the documents.



"It is one little room, and we need a place where people can go - serious scholars - in a secure environment where they can lay out all the materials and do the scanning and copying," Marquardt said. "It's going to take a facility."